Landscape Photography Q&A | Money, Careers, Sponsorships & More

Landscape Photography Q&A | Money, Careers, Sponsorships & More


My E-Book: http://geni.us/onlocation
Website: http://www.thomasheaton.co.uk

This is an unusually long episode of questions and answers. Most of which are landscape photography related.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ThomasHeatonPhotography
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**Stuff You Saw in this Video**
My Watch, people always ask about my GPS watch: http://geni.us/GarminFenix3
My GoPro Gimbal: http://geni.us/Gimbal
My Main Vlogging Camera: http://geni.us/CanG5X
My Mini Drone: http://geni.us/Mavic
All of these are affiliate links #justsaying

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the worker

A worker is picking potatoes
October is the right time for harvesting potatoes in Dehgolan, one of the largest regions for the cultivation of this crop in Iran. Due to the potentiality of the soil and water of this area, its people cultivate more than 95% of their land with potatoes each year

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Behind The Shot: After The Fire

Behind The Shot: After The Fire
Photo By Andy Wolcott

These days, people around Jackson, Wyoming, refer to it as “The Burn,” the largest wildfire in the history of Grand Teton National Park. The Berry Fire, ignited by lightning on July 25, 2016, burned for more than two months before park management filed its last report on Sept. 21. The fire ultimately consumed just over 21,000 acres of lodgepole and spruce timber, short grass and brush in a swath reaching from its origin near the Berry and Owl Creeks on the west side of Jackson Lake, north around the lake, to the base of Huckleberry Mountain east of the highway connecting Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. The highway was closed repeatedly as fire crossed the road, reducing visibility to near-zero and making driving virtually impossible—and definitely unsafe.

While wildfires can be devastating tragedies, they are also a natural and necessary event in the continuing revitalization of healthy landscapes and wildlife habitats. Lodgepole pines, for example, cannot open their cones to release their seeds without the extreme heat of a forest fire. Old undergrowth is cleared out, making way for fresh grasses, trees and other vegetation critical to wildlife survival.

National Park Service policy calls for human-caused fire to be actively suppressed but naturally caused fires like this one to be monitored and only suppressed if they threaten park infrastructure or communities. In the case of the Berry Fire, years of preparation clearing land around structures, limiting construction materials to only those that are fire-resistant, ensuring that firewood and other flammables were located away from structures, and educating land-owners about fire safety greatly limited damage to private property.

For the photographer, the aftermath of a wildfire like this one presents virtually unlimited opportunities to capture the stark beauty of a landscape resculptured in an instant by nature. Armed with a carload of gear (most of which I never used), I was fortunate to arrive in Jackson only a few days after the road to Yellowstone was reopened. I spent several days repeatedly visiting the burned areas accessible from the highway between the two parks photographing wide landscapes and the tiny details of the aftermath of the fire.

I could not really have imagined, however, what I would find a year later, after a fortuitous and entirely unexpected light snowfall in the black forest I had shot a year earlier. The blackened bark had begun to peel away, leaving bright orange swaths of unburned wood behind. Where there had been virtually nothing but burned grass, twigs and shattered pinecones at the base of the trees a year earlier, new grasses and flowers had sprung up everywhere. Spectacular fireweed had grown up, bloomed and gone to seed in the intervening year. The dusting of snow created an incredible palette of black and white with just a touch of color here and there.

The tiny lodgepoles I had hoped to find are not yet there. The seeds spread everywhere on the ground last year have yet to germinate. I will be back next September to find the new forest sprouting and growing in profusion, as I know it will be.

See more of Andy Wolcott’s work at andywolcott.com and on Instagram @andywolcott.

Nikon D750, AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR @ 72mm. Exposure: 1/160 sec., ƒ/11, ISO 800.

The post Behind The Shot: After The Fire appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo Of The Day By Gary Fua

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Courting” by Gary Fua.
Photo By Gary Fua

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Courting” by Gary Fua.

Camera: Canon EOS 7D

See more of Gary Fua’s photography at www.flickr.com/photos/east-wind.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including Assignments, Galleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Gary Fua appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Siblings lay in their backyard in Watford, North Dakota.

Curtis, Kate and Jude, siblings, lay in their backyard in Watford, North Dakota. 6 July 2017. The Long family has five children whom they homeschool. Western North Dakota attracted families from across the nation during the recent oil boom. Watford, like other rural towns in the region, is now facing unemployment and overdevelopment since the decline of the oil industry.

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Photo Of The Day By Garry Everett

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Fire Water” by Garry Everett. Location: Horsetail Falls, Yosemite National Park, California.
Photo By Garry Everett

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Fire Water” by Garry Everett. Location: Horsetail Fall, Yosemite National Park, California.

“Horsetail Fall in Yosemite—this 2017 image captures the fall with light only on the bottom half,” Everett says of the image. “I framed the photo tightly on the falls and mist to try and bring some emphasis to this unusual light condition.”

See more of Garry Everett’s photography at www.gelandscapephoto.com.

Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including Assignments, Galleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Garry Everett appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Nikon 180-400mm f/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR Super Tele Zoom Introduced

Nikon 180-400mm f/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR

When it’s released in March 2018, the new AF-S NIKKOR 180-400mm f/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR will be the second most expensive lens in Nikon’s current lens lineup, after the AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR ($16,299) and just barley topping the AF-S NIKKOR 600mm f/4E FL ED VR ($12,299). Aimed at professional wildlife and sports photographers, its constant f/4 maximum aperture throughout the zoom range and its built-in 1.4x teleconverter make it an extremely versatile telephoto lens.

Nikon 180-400mm f/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR close up (right)
On the right side of the barrel is a large switch to engage the built-in teleconverter.

Designed for use with full-frame FX Nikon DSLRs, a generously-sized switch on the barrel of the lens engages the teleconverter, extending the lens’s range to 252-560mm. It can also be used with DX Nikons like the D500, providing an equivalent focal length range of 270-600mm at 1.0x, or 378-840mm with the teleconverter. Nikon states that the AF algorithm for this lens has been improved to increase tracking for moving subjects, and that when used with the latest generation of Nikon DSLRs equipped with its 153-point AF system — specifically the D5, D850 and D500 — AF performance is further enhanced via cross-type sensors.

Nikon 180-400mm f/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR, close up (left)
Controls on the left side of the lens barrel include switches for focus settings and Vibration Reduction (VR).

The lens accepts 40.5mm drop-in filters, can focus as close as 6.6 feet and employs a dual-mode VR system. As you’d expect, this is a relatively large and weighty lens, at approximately 7.7 pounds, 5 inches in diameter and 1.2 inches long. List price: $12,399.

For additional information, see the press release below.

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NIKON ANNOUNCES NEW AF-S NIKKOR 180-400mm F/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR SUPER TELEPHOTO ZOOM LENS AT CES 2018

LAS VEGAS — CES BOOTH #14018 (January 8, 2018) – Today at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Nikon Inc. announced the new AF-S NIKKOR 180-400mm f/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR super-telephoto zoom lens, which is ideally suited for photographing sports and wildlife with astounding speed and clarity. This professional level FX-format lens is more versatile than ever, and has been updated with the newest NIKKOR lens technologies including Nikon’s first ever built-in teleconverter and an advanced optical formula to enhance performance and minimize weight.

“This lens is a great example of how Nikon continues to push the boundaries of innovation and what’s possible with pro-level optics and high-end imaging equipment,” said Kosuke Kawaura, Director of Marketing and Planning, Nikon Inc.

Popular Pro-Level Lens Gets Even More Versatile

This new NIKKOR lens is a professional super-telephoto zoom lens, which is even more versatile with an extended wide range of 180-400mm, and a constant f/4 aperture to easily isolate a subject from the sidelines, even in challenging light. This is also the first NIKKOR lens to include a built-in 1.4X teleconverter, allowing photographers to seamlessly swap to a 252-560mm1 (FX-format) focal range. The teleconverter is engaged at the flick of a switch, and is easily operated with a single finger while looking through the viewfinder. When used on the Nikon D500 and other DX-format DSLRs, the focal length is the equivalent of 270-600mm (378-840mm with teleconverter engaged).

Whether capturing fast-moving winter sports on the slopes or elusive wildlife at a distance, photographers can shoot with confidence from this high performance NIKKOR lens.  The new 180-400mm f/4 is optimized for high-speed capture, and features an electromagnetic diaphragm, helping to create smooth and consistent exposures while shooting high-speed bursts of images. What’s more, the AF tracking algorithm controlling the motor drive has been enhanced to increase tracking performance of fast moving subjects. When using cameras equipped with Nikon’s advanced 153-point AF system (D5, D500, D850), the outer row of AF points are activated as cross-type sensors to significantly enhance the AF coverage throughout the frame.2

Enhanced Performance with the Addition of New Technology

The lens now uses a fluorite element, which contributes to improved balance while minimizing weight. To further enhance handling and agility, the lens has adopted a new ball-bearing tripod collar ring to create a seamless transition from shooting horizontal to vertical composition.  The VR mechanism offers a normal and sports mode, with up to four stops3 of compensation to help create sharp images, even when handheld.

The lens construction includes the use of durable magnesium alloy for weight reduction, while the lens is also sealed against dust and moisture. A fluorine coating is also used to help repel water droplets and dirt.

The optical formula of the lens uses eight Extra Low Dispersion (ED) elements, doubling the amount of ED elements used by its predecessor, the NIKKOR 200-400mm. These help to provide extremely sharp and detailed images and 4K UHD / 1080p video, and is ideally mated to high resolution Nikon DSLR cameras.  Nikon’s exclusive Nano Crystal Coat is used to effectively suppress instances of ghosting and flare.

Price and Availability

The AF-S NIKKOR 180-400mm f/4E TC1.4 FL ED VR lens will be available in March 2018 for a suggested retail price of $12,399.954. For more information on this NIKKOR lens and other Nikon products, please visit www.nikonusa.com. 

  1. When the built-in or an external teleconverter is used, the focal length may not be displayed correctly in shooting information / Image data.
  2. This feature will be available with a firmware upgrade for the D5, D850 and D500 as of March 2018 
  3. Based on CIPA Standard. This value is achieved when FX-format compatible lenses are attached to a FX-format digital SLR camera and zoom lenses are set at the maximum telephoto position.
  4. SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.


Specifications, equipment and release dates are subject to change without any notice or obligation on the part of the manufacturer.

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Landscape Photography: Picture Perfect iPhone Photography with Jack Hollingsworth

Landscape Photography: Picture Perfect iPhone Photography with Jack Hollingsworth


http://www.adorama.com

Join Jack Hollingsworth in the series of Picture Perfect as he shares some of his iPhone Photography knowledge and explains how to take the best Landscape Photographs using your iPhone.

Tech Notes from Jack:
1. Because I shoot so often at dawn and dusk, I almost always use a tripod
• Mefoto is my favorite tripod brand
• I use a Mefoto Sidekick 360 adapter to attach my iPhone to my tripod

2. On the iPhone, because of the relative small size of the lens compared to a tiny sensor that fixed F2.2 aperture is more like shooting at F22.
• That means that most subjects you shoot, in bright light, will have “deep focus” or lots of depth-of-field
• The only exception to this is 1: when you are shooting in low-light and 2: when your camera-to-subject focusing distance is close

3. The iPhone has a built-in matrix average meter and can be fooled when shooting into bright light sources like the sun
• When shooting into the sun, lock your exposure-reticle on the subject itself and not the background.
• If you instead lock your exposure on the background i.e. sky, instead of subject i.e. person, you’ll end up with a silhouette.

4. Almost all digital files, even iPhone JPEGS, can be improved my making small adjustment edits
• I use the default Photos app for making quick adjustments to exposure, contrast, brightness, saturation
• For more granular control I use these 3rd party editing apps-VSCO, Snapseed, Camera+, Enlight

5. My favorite time of the day for shooting landscape photography is either early morning or late afternoon
• You have about a full hour of sweet light, right after sunrise. Shoot away!
• You also have another hour of gorgeous light, right before sunset and about 45 minutes after sunset

6. The Time-lapse feature of the iPhone is simple and stunning.
• Time-lapse mode captures 2 Frames-per-second -FPS, combines them into a 1080p video clip, and plays them back at 30 FPS -15X faster than actual speed
• Time-lapse longer than 10 minutes and shorter than 20 minutes, will be recorded at 30X actual speed.

7. Did you know that the iPhone, in panorama mode, can take up to 63MP files
• Panos can cover a full 240 degree Field-of-View
• Panos can be as large as 63MP -16,400X3900 Pixels. Very impressive, and they print well too!

8. The iPhone 6s Plus has built In Optical-Image-Stabilization -OIS-
• OIS Is perfect for recording video and also shooting stills in low-light, it works on both stills and video
• The iPhone 6 only has Digital-Image-Stabilization -DIS- which is not as powerful as OIS
• I think shooting with an iPhone 6s Plus is worth it just for the OIS-really! (you pick up, practically a couple stops of light when shooting)

9. The editing tools/ Photos App that come bundled with the iPhone are actually quite a powerful tool set for basic image editing
• I use the Photos App, for basic adjustments, when I want to get in and out in less than a minute. Slider controls are simple and intuitive and fast.
• If, and when, I want to spend more than 1 minute, editing photos, I’ll likely opt for more comprehensive 3rd party editing apps

10. I sparingly use attachment lenses with my iPhone camera. When I do it’s because I need to get close or wider than the default lens allows
• The default iPhone camera lens, 4.2mm, F2.2/fixed, has a Field-of-View around 71 degrees
• To get wider or close than 71 degrees FOV, you’ll need either a Telephoto or Wide angle attachment lens.
• I personally like the Olloclip active kit that comes with a 2x Telephoto and Ultra-Wide Angle glass.

Related Products at Adorama:

MeFOTO SideKick360 Plus Smartphone Adapter for Tripods
http://www.adorama.com/MFMPH200A.html?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_content=video&utm_campaign=Landscape%20Photography%3A%20Picture%20Perfect%20iPhone%20Photography%20with%20Jack%20Hollingsworth

MeFOTO RoadTrip Aluminum Travel Tripod with Ballhead
http://www.adorama.com/bea1350q1abk.html?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_content=video&utm_campaign=Landscape%20Photography%3A%20Picture%20Perfect%20iPhone%20Photography%20with%20Jack%20Hollingsworth

Olloclip Active Lens for iPhone 6/6s/6 Plus/6s Plus
http://www.adorama.com/OLOC126EU.html?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_content=video&utm_campaign=Landscape%20Photography%3A%20Picture%20Perfect%20iPhone%20Photography%20with%20Jack%20Hollingsworth

Photos by Jack Hollingsworth

Like, share, and comment on the video below…let’s get the conversation started!

If you have questions, please share them below.

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Alan Cumming, Actor

From ‘Kings & Queens in Their Castles’, portraits of LGBTQ Americans at home, more at: www.tomatwood.com/kings-queens

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Photo Of The Day By Lloyd Dykstra

 

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Just A Snow Drift” by Lloyd Dykstra. Location: Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada.
Photo By Lloyd Dykstra

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Just A Snow Drift” by Lloyd Dykstra. Location: Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada.

Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

See more Lloyd Dykstra’s photography at www.wowimages.ca.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including Assignments, Galleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Lloyd Dykstra appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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