Must-Have Wildlife Photography Gear

Must-Have Wildlife Photography Gear


A wildlife photographic adventure takes planning. What wildlife photography gear should you bring along on your adventure? In this free video, professional outdoor photographer, Ian Plant, shows you what essential gear he uses to capture memorable, wildlife images.

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the girl and the rooster

Simien Mountains National Park
young girl in Amaras village in charge of the barnyard

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Olympus OM-D System: Lighter And Better

Olympus OM-D Horsetail Falls
Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, Olympus M.ZUIKO Digital ED 12-100mm F/4.0 IS PRO at 13mm. Exposure: 60 sec., ƒ/20, ISO 200.

When you’re setting out on a 10-day backcountry trip to capture an iconic landscape photo, you need to have the right gear with you—but you also need to pay attention to every ounce in your pack. “You have no control over the conditions,” explains professional photographer Ross Kyker. “Clearing a bit of room from my bag allows me to take more essentials. I can go on hikes and not worry about running out of food.”

That’s why Kyker switched from traditional DSLRs to the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II after he tried one on a trip to Yosemite. “I absolutely fell in love,” Kyker says, “and the image stabilization sold me on the system.” The in-body 5-axis image stabilization in the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II provides up to 5.5 stops of compensation, and when combined with an Olympus M.Zuiko lens with built-in stabilization, provides up to 6.5 stops of compensation.

“Being able to do a two-second exposure without a tripod was a game changer. When I shot with DSLRs, if I was hiking and saw a scene I wanted to capture on the way to my destination, I would just bypass it because of the hassle of setting up my tripod. Having a camera with such incredible stabilization made it possible to get the shots I would have missed. It’s made photography fun again.

“If you’re shooting with a long lens, the rule has been that you can’t handhold slower than one over the focal length, so a 300mm lens you can’t shoot below 1/300 sec. for a sharp image. Even with my DSLR gear, stabilization never allowed me to get more than around a stop or two slower than that. You can’t do things like blur water at

1/100th of a second. When I was in Yosemite in dark and shaded areas I just crouched and handheld the shot for three to four seconds. That was the selling point for me.”

Kyker made the decision to replace his DSLR gear with the OM-D E-M1 Mark II because of the weight savings and stabilization, but he admits he couldn’t have made the switch if the camera didn’t deliver the razor-sharp images a good landscape photo requires. “I edited my photos from the first trip and couldn’t believe how sharp the images were.”

He also uses the 50 MP High Res Shot Mode, which takes eight consecutive shots and then combines them into one ultra-high-res image. The camera’s TruePic™ VIII image processor can eliminate the blur of movement between frames, and the image quality, Kyker says, “is amazing.”

For landscapes, his go-to lens is the Olympus M.Zuiko 12-100mm f4.0 IS PRO, which he selected for its legendary image quality, wide range of focal lengths, and its rugged weatherproofing, something that is helpful when your office is a tent under the open sky. “I used to carry a 24-70mm and a 70-200mm lens for my DSLR gear; it was awful to carry that around. My entire Olympus setup doesn’t weigh what my 70-200mm lens did.” The 12-100mm f4.0 IS PRO gives Kyker the equivalent range of 24-200mm, providing in one, compact lens what used to require two bulky DSLR lenses.

“Sometimes I get a shot on the first day of a trip,” he says, “and sometimes not until day 10. I’ve literally cleared out half of my backpack. With that room I can pack an extra two or three days’ worth of food.” That means Kyker can stay out longer to nab the perfect landscape, and not risk missing the shot because he’s out of supplies. “I can also bring my hammock now,” says Kyker, “which makes the trip so much more enjoyable.”

Many photographers, Kyker says, are concerned about the sensor size, but he says that hasn’t been an issue. “It’s been drilled into every photographer’s brain that we need a full-frame camera, but that’s just not the case at all. The images are razor-sharp, and I still make large prints of my landscapes.”

Hear more from other photographers who have made the switch to the Olympus OM-D system at getolympus.com/neverlookback.

The post Olympus OM-D System: Lighter And Better appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo Of The Day By Hilda Champion

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “The Eyes” by Hilda Champion. Location: Playa de Campiecho, Asturias, Spain.
Photo By Hilda Champion

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “The Eyes” by Hilda Champion. Location: Playa de Campiecho, Asturias, Spain.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including Assignments, Galleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Hilda Champion appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Nature Photography – Lenses

Nature Photography – Lenses


Larry and Joanne Mars from Leisureworld Maryland discuss different types of lenses for nature photography. Join them on their photo safari in the deserts of Arizona.

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Backstage life

These people in the backside of theater practice expression during the break.

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The Colony At The Edge Of The World

The Colony At The Edge Of The World
Photo By Lauren Buchholz

It’s not easy standing out in New Zealand’s feathered crowd. From flightless kiwis to the world’s only alpine parrot, the birdlife on this tiny South Pacific nation has an incredible diversity. Yet, with striking white, black and gold plumage and a wingspan extending nearly 6 feet, Australasian gannets fit the bill as some of the country’s most remarkable seabirds.

New Zealand accounts for the bulk of the world’s breeding gannet population, and nearly 10 percent of all Australasian gannets return to a single location in southeastern Hawke’s Bay on the North Island. On a remote spit near Cape Kidnappers, the birds gather annually from their trans-oceanic voyages to court, lay their eggs and raise their young atop exposed precipices overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Despite the trials of living on an open plateau susceptible to some of the planet’s harshest UV rays and gale-force southerly winds from Antarctica, some 6,500 breeding pairs call this location home.

The window for photographing gannets with their chicks lasts for up to four months each year, but uncooperative weather conditions coupled with the difficulty of accessing the site meant that planning and patience were critical to achieving this image. I waited eight weeks to get the ideal set of conditions for capturing the colony against an approaching southerly storm at sunset—a backdrop that helped emphasize the beauty and wildness of their natural environment. On an extremely windy January evening (high summer in the Southern Hemisphere), all of the elements came together, and I set out for the Cape.

Photographing wildlife in low light is a balancing act between avoiding excessive camera noise and shadows and preventing motion blur, and while I brought my tripod with me that evening, I ended up setting it aside so I could react more spontaneously to the scene before me. Halfway through the shoot, I was drawn to the way this perspective of the colony provided a striking foreground to the magenta-colored sky. As I was keen to preserve the incredible sunset hues while at the same time maintaining detail in the birds, I pushed my ISO up and used a graduated neutral-density filter. My slow shutter speed isn’t typical for wildlife photography, but it allowed me to capture enough light in the foreground so that I didn’t have to use flash, which would have greatly disturbed the birds and their chicks.

As a nature photography instructor and conservationist, I have an interest in sharing our planet’s beauty with others stemming from an artistic as well as a conscientious standpoint. I’ve had the privilege of photographing and working with incredible landscapes and wildlife, and I’ve seen time and again how strong our connection to these places and creatures can become once we’ve experienced them for ourselves. While most people may not have the opportunity to see Australasian gannets at the bottom of the planet first-hand, sharing images of moments like this showcases the power of photography in building those connections.

Nikon D600, AF-S NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4G ED VR. Exposure: 1/13 sec., ƒ/13, ISO 800.

See more of Lauren Buchholz’s work at pbase.com/natural_visions.

 

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Photo Of The Day By Vaibhav Tripathi

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Morning Takeoff” by Vaibhav Tripathi. Location: Merced National Wildlife Refuge, California.
Photo By Vaibhav Tripathi

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Morning Takeoff” by Vaibhav Tripathi. Location: Merced National Wildlife Refuge, California.

“Snow and Ross’s Geese take off on a winter morning at Merced Wildlife Refuge,” describes Tripathi.

Follow Lyrical Outdoors on Facebook to see more images by Vaibhav Tripathi.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including Assignments, Galleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Vaibhav Tripathi appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Kayaking / Wildlife Photography Outing at Summit Lake State Park Video 1

Kayaking / Wildlife Photography Outing at Summit Lake State Park Video 1


test video

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The devil owns the carnival in Bolivia

While visiting Bolivia for carnival, I came across a group of demons. this apparently was demon leader. He sulfur his way during that cold night.

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